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Bertrand Russell, A History of Western Philosophy Quotes: The problem of finding a collection of “wise” men and leaving the government to them is thus an insoluble one. That is the ultimate reason for democracy.
         

The problem of finding a collection of “wise” men and leaving the government to them is thus an insoluble one. That is the ultimate reason for democracy.


Bertrand Russell, A History of Western Philosophy
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The problem of finding a collection of “wise” men and leaving the government to them is thus an insoluble one. That is the ultimate reason for democracy.
         





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Other quotes of Bertrand Russell, A History of Western Philosophy


Science tells us what we can know, but what we can know is little, and if we forget how much we cannot know, we become insensitive to many things of great importance.

Science tells us what we can know, but what we can know is little, and if we forget how much we cannot know, we become insensitive to many things of great importance.



Almost everything that distinguishes the modern world from earlier centuries is attibutable to science, which achieved its most spectacular triumphs in the seventeenth century.

Almost everything that distinguishes the modern world from earlier centuries is attibutable to science, which achieved its most spectacular triumphs in the seventeenth century.



The search for something permanent is one of the deepest of the instincts leading men to philosophy.

The search for something permanent is one of the deepest of the instincts leading men to philosophy.



To teach how to live without certainty, and yet without being paralyzed by hesitation, is perhaps the chief thing that philosophy, in our age, can still do for those who study it.

To teach how to live without certainty, and yet without being paralyzed by hesitation, is perhaps the chief thing that philosophy, in our age, can still do for those who study it.



What Galileo and Newton were to the seventeenth century, Darwin was to the nineteenth.

What Galileo and Newton were to the seventeenth century, Darwin was to the nineteenth.





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This page presents the quote "The problem of finding a collection of “wise” men and leaving the government to them is thus an insoluble one. That is the ultimate reason for democracy.". Author of this quote is Bertrand Russell, A History of Western Philosophy. .